Economic Outlook

The Fed Remains Focused on Raising Rates, Despite Low Inflation

The Fed is opportunistically tightening

After nearly a decade of near-zero interest rates in the U.S., the Federal Reserve embarked on a rate hiking cycle at the end of 2015. However, despite two rate increases in 2017, financial conditions have eased this year, as shown by PIMCO’s financial conditions index on the chart. While the easing may seem counterintuitive, the Fed’s current hiking cycle has more to do with getting away from the dreaded zero bound than it does with traditional tightening to slow an overheating economy. Thus, the Fed is taking the opportunity to gain room to manoeuvre rates without upsetting solid (if lacklustre) growth.

The Fed is opportunistically tightening

What it means for Investors

With the U.S. leading the way in raising rates, European investors may continue to find the higher yields of U.S. Treasuries an attractive alternative to domestic bonds. As the Fed has signalled that it will take a gradual approach, they may also want to consider Treasury Inflation-Protected Securities (TIPS) that could serve as attractively priced hedges against upside surprises in U.S. inflation.

This content is taken from Putting Markets in Perspective, a quarterly guide to the global economy and markets highlighting PIMCO’s current investment views.

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Disclosures

All data as of 30 June 2017 unless otherwise stated.

FOR PROFESSIONAL USE ONLY.

Past performance is not a guarantee or a reliable indicator of future results.

PIMCO Funds: Global Investors Series plc is an umbrella type open-ended investment company with variable capital and is incorporated with limited liability under the laws of Ireland with registered number 276928. The information is not for use within any country or with respect to any person(s) where such use could constitute a violation of the applicable law. The information contained in this communication is intended to supplement information contained in the prospectus for this Fund and must be read in conjunction therewith. Investors should consider the investment objectives, risks, charges and expenses of these Funds carefully before investing. This and other information is contained in the Fund’s prospectus. Please read the prospectus carefully before you invest or send money. Past performance is not a guarantee or a reliable indicator of future results and no guarantee is being made that similar returns will be achieved in the future. Returns are net of fees and other expenses and include reinvestment of dividends. The performance data represents past performance and investment return and principal value will fluctuate so that the PIMCO GIS Funds shares, when redeemed, may be worth more or less than the original cost. Potential differences in performance figures are due to rounding. The Fund may invest in non-U.S. or non-Eurozone securities which involves potentially higher risks including non-U.S. or non-Euro currency fluctuations and political or economic uncertainty. For informational purposes only. Please note that not all Funds are registered for sale in every jurisdiction. Please contact PIMCO Europe Ltd for more information. For additional information and/or a copy of the Fund’s prospectus, please contact the Administrator: State Street Fund Services (Ireland) Limited and State Street Custodial Services (Ireland) Limited (collectively “State Street”), Telephone +353 1 7768000, Fax: +353 1 7768491. © 2017.

Volatility - a statistical measure of the dispersion of returns for a given security or market index. Benchmark - Unless otherwise stated in the prospectus or in the relevant key investor information document, the Fund referenced in this material is not managed against a particular benchmark or index, and any reference to a particular benchmark or index in this material is made solely for risk or performance comparison purposes. Additional information - This material may contain additional information, not explicit in the prospectus, on how the Fund or strategy is currently managed. Such information is current as at the date of the presentation and may be subject to change without notice. Investment Restrictions - In accordance with the UCITS regulations and subject to any investment restrictions outlined in the Fund’s prospectus, the Fund may invest over 35% of net assets in different transferable securities and money market instruments issued or guaranteed by any of the following: OECD Governments (provided the relevant issues are investment grade), Government of Singapore, European Investment Bank, European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, International Finance Corporation, International Monetary Fund, Euratom, The Asian Development Bank, European Central Bank, Council of Europe, Eurofima, African Development Bank, International Bank for Reconstruction and Development (The World Bank), The Inter American Development Bank, European Union, Federal National Mortgage Association (Fannie Mae), Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation (Freddie Mac), Government National Mortgage Association (Ginnie Mae), Student Loan Marketing Association (Sallie Mae), Federal Home Loan Bank, Federal Farm Credit Bank, Tennessee Valley Authority, Straight-A Funding LLC.

RISK: Investing in the bond market is subject to risks, including market, interest rate, issuer, credit, inflation risk, and liquidity risk. The value of most bonds and bond strategies are impacted by changes in interest rates. Bonds and bond strategies with longer durations tend to be more sensitive and volatile than those with shorter durations; bond prices generally fall as interest rates rise, and the current low interest rate environment increases this risk. Current reductions in bond counterparty capacity may contribute to decreased market liquidity and increased price volatility. Bond investments may be worth more or less than the original cost when redeemed. Commodities contain heightened risk, including market, political, regulatory and natural conditions, and may not be suitable for all investors. Currency rates may fluctuate significantly over short periods of time and may reduce the returns of a portfolio. Derivatives may involve certain costs and risks, such as liquidity, interest rate, market, credit, management and the risk that a position could not be closed when most advantageous. Investing in derivatives could lose more than the amount invested. Equities may decline in value due to both real and perceived general market, economic and industry conditions. Investing in foreign-denominated and/or -domiciled securities may involve heightened risk due to currency fluctuations, and economic and political risks, which may be enhanced in emerging markets. Sovereign securities are generally backed by the issuing government. Obligations of U.S. government agencies and authorities are supported by varying degrees, but are generally not backed by the full faith of the U.S. government. Portfolios that invest in such securities are not guaranteed and will fluctuate in value. High yield, lower-rated securities involve greater risk than higher-rated securities; portfolios that invest in them may be subject to greater levels of credit and liquidity risk than portfolios that do not. Mortgage- and asset-backed securities may be sensitive to changes in interest rates, subject to early repayment risk, and while generally supported by a government, government-agency or private guarantor, there is no assurance that the guarantor will meet its obligations. Income from municipal bonds may be subject to state and local taxes and at times the alternative minimum tax. Swaps are a type of derivative; swaps are increasingly subject to central clearing and exchange-trading. Swaps that are not centrally cleared and exchange-traded may be less liquid than exchange-traded instruments. Inflation-linked bonds (ILBs) issued by a government are fixed income securities whose principal value is periodically adjusted according to the rate of inflation; ILBs decline in value when real interest rates rise. Treasury Inflation-Protected Securities (TIPS) are ILBs issued by the U.S. government. Certain U.S. government securities are backed by the full faith of the government. Obligations of U.S. government agencies and authorities are supported by varying degrees but are generally not backed by the full faith of the U.S. government. Portfolios that invest in such securities are not guaranteed and will fluctuate in value.